February 28, 2017

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NEW CARLETON PROGRAM AIMS TO REVIVE THE TRADITIONAL ART OF CRAFTING MOCCASINS

NEW CARLETON PROGRAM AIMS TO REVIVE THE TRADITIONAL ART OF CRAFTING MOCCASINS

Carleton University’s Centre for Aboriginal Culture and Education (CACE) in partnership with Manitobah Mukluks, is launching the Storyboot project today.

This innovative new program for Carleton students will take place over six weeks and is part of Carleton’s commitment to include Indigenous knowledge in its learning environment.

Students will be taught by Algonquin artisan Stephanie Tenasco from Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg while potentially earning credits towards their degrees. The Storyboot project aims to revive the traditional Aboriginal art of crafting pucker-toe moccasins by hand.

“It’s about, on a lot of levels, creating pride in who the students are by celebrating their culture and having that tradition passed down,” said Waneek Horn-Miller, a Carleton alumna and director of the Storyboot program. “It’s to make the students feel like they’re part of this process of cultural revitalization.”

The Storyboot project was started in Winnipeg last year as a way to preserve culture and support economic development in Aboriginal communities.

Media Contact
Steven Reid
Media Relations Officer
Carleton University
613-520-2600 ext. 8718
613-265-6613
Steven_Reid3@Carleton.ca

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MUSKRAT Magazine

MUSKRAT is an on-line Indigenous arts, culture magazine that honours the connection between humans and our traditional ecological knowledge by exhibiting original works and critical commentary. MUSKRAT embraces both rural and urban settings and uses media arts, the Internet, and wireless technology to investigate and disseminate traditional knowledges in ways that inspire their reclamation.

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